An Intimate Evening with Gibson Brothers, Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley

An Intimate Evening with Gibson Brothers, Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley

Starts in 30 Days, 19 Hours

November 16, 2019 8:00 pm

Saturday November 16, 2019
B Chord Brewing presents:
An intimate evening with Gibson Brothers, Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley

Tickets: $15 Advance // $20 Door

The Gibson Brothers—siblings Eric and Leigh Gibson—have already made over a dozen albums, but none quite like the new Dan Auerbach–produced Mockingbird. Their newest venture is an effortless blend of classic ’70s-infused rock and timeless country, a modern twist on their traditional sound, and harmonies that will keep you wishing for more. The celebrated duo — named back-to-back Entertainers of the Year by the International Bluegrass Music Association in 2012 and 2013 — played the Nashville game two decades ago, while in their early 20s, and were offered a major label deal, only to be told at the last minute that they were too “retro” for modern country music. Today, such characterizations, along with their authenticity, set them apart and describes the marvelous Mockingbird.
A mix of country, soul and seventies rock, the album further cements the sibling duo as musical trailblazers. As players and vocalists, they are superb, harmonizing as only siblings can; as songwriters they stand without peer, having long been a band awarded for their songs and songwriting. The 11 tracks on Mockingbird, their 14th album, draw on much of the brothers’ experiences being raised on the family farm in Northern New York. As Northerners growing up in a Southern business, they had to work twice as hard as the bands from the South to achieve the success they had, and were the first from that far north to carve a path to IBMA Entertainers of the Year.
“The songs on this album are the sounds we heard growing up, riding around with our dad, who was a farmer, in his pickup, or with our mom in her station wagon. This sound was on the radio,” says Leigh, citing the Eagles, Bob Seger, Tom Petty, and the warm country sounds of Don Williams, Emmylou Harris and Waylon Jennings as influences for Mockingbird, produced by the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach with Fergie Ferguson (Johnny Cash, Sturgill Simpson and Tyler Childers).
Songs like “Cool Drink of Water” and “Love the Land” exemplify that late-Sixties and early-Seventies vibe. The former sounds like something Elvis, at the height of his ’68 Comeback cool, would have recorded, while “Love the Land” is inspired by the simple desire to spend more time in nature. “I love the land that loves this man / and sets his soul at ease,” goes the centerpiece lyric. The song also provides the album with its title, as Leigh sings about the “song so sweet” of the mockingbird. “They’re an interpreter of different sounds and that’s what we’re doing here,” says Leigh. “We’re known for one sound, but we’re interpreting another part of our musicality.”
Coloring outside the lines is not unfamiliar to the Gibson Brothers, whose innate talent as writers and vocalists allows them to float seamlessly between genres. In that way, they’re outsiders — refusing to be confined to just one sound – which is why they chose to work with a rock producer and a band of legendary session players like drummer Gene Chrisman and guitarist Billy Sanford for Mockingbird.
Listen to “Come Down,” which evokes the 70’s sound of radio rock kings America or the passionate Exile on Main Street style R&B of “Lay Your Body Down.” Both dispel any notion that the Gibsons are solely a bluegrass act and prove Eric and Leigh’s gift for penning boundary-pushing songs. Likewise, “Sweet Lucinda,” with its shuffling rhythm, taps into country-rock, and “I’m a Better Man” slinks along with Bobby Wood’s Wurlitzer electric piano.
Mockingbird’s most left-field track, however, is a cover of R.E.M.’s 1993 weeper “Everybody Hurts.” Suggested by Ferguson, the ballad became the ideal duet for Leigh and Eric, with the brothers making the song their own via their yearning delivery and the house band’s lush arrangement. “I think it’s a beautiful song, but I couldn’t picture us doing it,” says Eric. “It surprised me with how it turned out. It was too good to not put on the record.”
The members of R.E.M. certainly agree. “It’s incredible! They did a great job,” says vocalist Michael Stipe. “It really re-focuses the song and lyric in a great way.” Bassist Mike Mills offers, “Wow. I really didn’t see that one coming. I love it,” with guitarist Peter Buck echoing those remarks: “Wow. Incredible.” Even Bill Berry, R.E.M.’s former drummer, and one of the original writers of the song, chimes in, saying, “It’s the best cover of it I’ve heard.”
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Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley-  Based on a mutual love of bluegrass, country, blues, western swing, and other string band music of all kinds, the partnership of dobro player Rob Ickes (who also plays superlative lap steel guitar in the duo on occasion) and acoustic/electric guitarist Trey Hensley continues to delight and astound audiences of traditional American music around the globe.  Since the duo decided to join forces and make their collaboration the focus of their touring and recording careers in 2015, after cutting their first album on Compass, Before The Sun Goes Down (nominated for a Grammy), they have continued to bring their music to venues near and far. They’ve performed in places as close to home as Nashville’s world famous Station Inn—a frequent and favorite showcase– and as far away as Denmark’s Tonder Festival as well as an impressive number of the most prestigious US  music festivals, including Rockygrass, ROMP, Wintergrass, Bluegrass Underground, and the Freshgrass Festival, just to name a few.  They have toured the European continent four times, as well as England, Ireland, and Australia.  Their second album on Compass, Country Blues, released in 2016, testified to the growing diversity and expansion of their collaborative talents and repertoire. The duo were key players on “Original,” the recent highly lauded Compass album by bluegrass giant Bobby Osborne; their participation garnered a Recorded Event Of The Year Award for Bobby’s version of “Got To Get A Message To You” on that album at this year’s IBMA Awards; they also were on the 2016 Recorded Event winner, ”Fireball,” featuring  Special Consensus, in 2016.  Upcoming news includes Rob and Trey sharing a number of concert bills, beginning in the fall of 2017 with the great and influential mandolin master David Grisman and Australia’s fleet finger picking guitarist Tommy Emmanuel, both enthusiastic admirers of the duo.

Rob and Trey continue to leave their singular–and ever growing—footprint on the world of traditional music of America–be it bluegrass, traditional country, acoustic—and electric– blues, or jazz. Of their collaboration, Rob has said this: “It works in so many different ways…Trey and I have always clicked, and when he and I know what’s going on, everyone else just grabs on—and that’s kind of the fun of the gig; it’s constantly changing.”  Whether they’re appearing as a duo, with a bass, or with bass, drums, and fiddle, they never fail to kick up some musical dust.  The excitement at their gigs is palpable, it is contagious, and it is constant. Their sets tend to be a heady mix of the familiar and beloved and the new and unexpected.  Trey’s list of powerful original songs has grown quickly since the two started working together, and Rob invariably plays several sparkling instrumentals, both on dobro and lap steel, new and old..  He is also on record as saying that one of his great satisfactions as a dobro player is accompanying a great vocalist, something the partnership allows him every night.
Rob, who grew up in California’s Bay Area, cut his teeth on traditional bluegrass, since several family members   played.  He fell in love with the dobro—or more precisely, the resophonic   guitar—almost immediately, after his brother Pat played a tape of the legendary Mike Auldridge for him. After moving to Nashville in the early ‘90s, he quickly became one of the instrument’s acknowledged masters.  He soon began touring with several top bluegrass acts, and also became a familiar face at recording studios in town. His fluid, lyrical, yet stinging style has graced the recordings and concerts  of bluegrass artists as diverse as Earl Scruggs, Alison Krauss, The Cox Family, Tony Rice, and more, plus such mainstream artists as Vince Gill, Alan Jackson, Toby Keith, Reba McEntire, and even erstwhile rocker David Lee Roth on his ‘bluegrass’ album. Additionally, Rob has won the Dobro Player of The Year Award from the IBMA an unprecedented FIFTEEN times. He was also a founding member of the critically acclaimed bluegrass ‘super group’ Blue Highway for twenty one years.  Fulfilling a lifelong dream of not only meeting but playing with his personal number one hero, Rob was a key member of the band who backed fellow Californian Merle Haggard on Merle’s 2007 album The Bluegrass Sessions.

Trey shares Rob’s admiration for the legendary Hag and features several of his songs in his repertoire.  In fact, his rich, resonant baritone voice can sound at times uncannily like The Okie From Muskogee…but he is capable of far more than that. He also plays blues and rhythm and blues  on both acoustic and electric guitar, from the repertoires of artists as diverse as The Allman Brothers, Ray Charles, Charlie Daniels, and Stevie Ray Vaughn…and Rob and Trey’s rendition of The Grateful Dead’s Friend Of  The Devil needs to be heard live to be fully appreciated. Trey also shares Haggard’s well known love of western swing, and he sings it and plays it with authority; Rob loves playing it, too, often on lap steel guitar. Trey is also a talented writer; the band’s repertoire is dotted with his original compositions.  Both he and Rob have what is called in the trade ‘big ears,’ and this musical curiosity has enhanced their music immeasurably.

Even more precocious than his musical partner, Trey grew up in eastern Tennessee, one of the cradles of traditional music. He doesn’t seem to have ever doubted what he was meant to do, and in fact, when he was eleven years old, he was brought onstage by Marty Stuart to play with Marty and Earl Scruggs—at the Grand Ole Opry. He was making music—and albums—with famous players before his voice changed. He has played onstage or opened for artists as diverse as Johnny Cash, Charlie Daniels, Steve Wariner, and Peter Frampton. It was his singing on what was meant to be a scratch vocal on a Blue Highway album that first brought him to the attention of Rob Ickes.  Ultimately, the vocal stayed on the album, Trey moved to Nashville, and in partnership with Rob, they began to make all manner of exciting music. Shortly after Trey appeared on the scene in Music City, bluegrass Hall Of Famer Roland White was heard to remark in wonderment, that he had a new favorite guitar player in Nashville—and Roland knows a few things about guitar players. Needless to say, Roland is not the only fan Trey has made in Nashville. In many ways, this musical partnership is the ideal vehicle for both partners.  Their excitement at playing together continues unabated; as their enthusiasm charges the creativity of their collaboration on a nightly basis.  It is the audience who stands to be the big winner.